Got a Bun in the Oven and Stressing Out? Here’s Your Month by Month Pregnancy to Do List

Heres-Your-Month-by-Month-Pregnancy-to-Do-ListMonth by Month Pregnancy to Do List

Got a bun in the oven and stressing out? We put together a month by month pregnancy to-do list to help make your pregnancy a little less stressful.

Finding out that you’re pregnant can be one of the most joyous discoveries of your life. But it can also be very stressful. There’s so much to do before your little one makes their debut!

If you’ve just found out that you’re pregnant and you’re wondering what you need to do during your pregnancy to prepare, we’ve got you covered! Here’s a month by month pregnancy to-do list to keep you on track. 

Month One/Two

Most women find out they’re pregnant between four and eight weeks into the pregnancy. This means that they’re in their second month of pregnancy before they even know they’ve got a bun in the oven.

You’re so early in your pregnancy, but there’s plenty on your to-do list already:

  • Start taking a prenatal vitamin if you haven’t already.
  • Choose an OB and schedule your first ultrasound.
  • Start cutting down on your caffeine intake. Caffeine fiends will be disappointed to hear that the American Pregnancy Association strongly suggests limiting your caffeine intake to 200mg per day for the duration of your pregnancy.
  • Talk to your doctor about your medications. You may need to cut out some medications that could be harmful to your baby. 
  • Start avoiding or eliminating foods that could negatively impact your baby like sushi, high mercury fish, lunch meats, raw eggs, and soft cheeses.
  • Maybe go to your first prenatal appointment. If your pregnancy is deemed high-risk for any reason you may have an early ultrasound scheduled for this first visit.

It might be hard to tackle these tasks due to the exhaustion that goes with early pregnancy, but the first few months of pregnancy are crucial. 

Month Three

Once you hit your third month of pregnancy, it’s sinking in that you’ve got a little one on the way. Morning sickness and other early pregnancy symptoms are hitting their peak. Don’t worry, they’ll pass soon.

Here’s what’s on the pregnancy to-do list this month:

  • Go to your first prenatal appointment and have your first ultrasound. Some doctors won’t schedule this appointment until week 9 or 10, which is when they’re sure to hear a heartbeat and get a good ultrasound photo of your little one. 
  • Dial-in your diet and exercise. You’ll want to eat nutritious foods and make sure to get at least 30 minutes of exercise four times a week to keep your body healthy and keep pregnancy weight gain under control. Be sure to talk to your doctor before making any changes to your diet and before changing your exercise regimen. 
  • Shop for maternity clothes! You probably don’t have a baby bump quite yet, but due to bloating caused by an influx of hormones, you may already have trouble fitting into your pants. 
  • Start planning maternity leave. Review your company’s maternity leave policy. By the end of the month, you might be ready to tell your employer about your pregnancy and you’ll need to be prepared to discuss maternity leave. 
  • Discuss genetic testing. Your doctor will offer genetic testing that can screen for certain chromosomal abnormalities. Discuss with your doctor and partner whether you want these tests. 

Morning sickness and other pesky first trimester symptoms might be slowing you down a bit. But make sure you stay on track with your to-dos so you don’t fall behind.

Month Four

You’ve made it out of the first trimester! Your morning sickness should be starting to pass and you might be sporting an adorable little baby bump. 

Here’s your to-do list for the month:

  • Start sleeping on your side. Later on in your pregnancy, sleeping on your back could lead to decreased blood flow to your baby. So, get a head start and get used to sleeping on your side now.
  • Start telling family and friends. Many people opt to wait until they’re out of the first trimester to start telling family and friends. The chances of miscarriage drop after the first trimester. So, if you haven’t already shared the good news, month four is the time.
  • Start your baby registry. Your baby shower will be here before you know it, so sit down with your partner and start adding items to that registry.
  • Ask your doctor about how to reduce pregnancy swelling. Your body produces more blood and fluids during pregnancy, which leads to swelling in the legs, ankles, feet, hands, and face. As your uterus grows, it also puts more pressure on your lower trunk, causing more swelling. Your doctor may recommend wearing supportive garments, like supportive garments, like compression socks, adding more potassium-rich foods in your diet, and proper rest to alleviate swelling during pregnancy.  

The second trimester is the easiest part of pregnancy for most women, so tackling these to-dos should be a little easier for a few months.

Month Five

By now those nasty first trimester symptoms are a thing of the past. You may even be experiencing a burst of energy. 

Take advantage of it to tackle this month’s to-do list:

  • Sign up for a childbirth class. Although these classes aren’t necessary, they provide a lot of helpful information about the birthing process.
  • Go for your anatomy scan. Around 20 weeks your OB will schedule an anatomy ultrasound. This ultrasound will be longer than your previous ultrasounds because the doctors are making sure that everything is where it’s supposed to be, that your baby is healthy and that your baby is growing at the right pace. This is often when couples find out the sex of their baby as well.
  • Finish up projects around the house. In the second trimester, your energy levels are likely to peak, which means this is the time to get things done. Once you hit the third trimester you won’t want to do anything but rest, so get it all done now!

Though you might be feeling like you can take on the world right now, remember to pace yourself. That burst of energy can turn to fatigue if you overdo it. 

Month 6

That third trimester is fast approaching! You’re feeling more ready than ever to welcome your baby to the world. 

Capitalize on that excitement with the tasks on this month’s to-do list:

  • Finalize childcare options. It may seem like you have all the time in the world to get childcare figured out. But many childcare centers have waiting lists that are months long. So, you’ll need to figure that out before the baby is even here.
  • Get started on the nursery. Many women don’t want to do the physical work of setting up the nursery during the third trimester. If that’s you, then you’ll need to at least get started on decorating and furnishing baby’s nursery this month. 
  • Get tested for Gestational Diabetes. Some women develop diabetes during pregnancy. It’s easy to manage with dietary changes. Get tested this month to see if you need to make changes.
  • Arrange your Birth Plan and Preregistration. If you have specific desires for your birth experience, write them down so you can share them with your providers and the hospital. Also, preregister with the hospital so you don’t have to take care of that while you’re in labor.

As your second trimester comes to a close, make sure that you’re taking advantage of how good you’re feeling. These to-dos will get harder to manage in a few months.

Month 7

Welcome to the third trimester. Baby’s arrival is closer than you think, so make sure you handle this month’s to-do list in a timely fashion.

  • Prenatal appointments become more frequent in the trimester. You’ll be seeing your OB every two weeks until the last month of your pregnancy.
  • Finish up the nursery and baby proof the house. Baby won’t be mobile for a while, but you don’t want to have to deal with this once the baby is home.
  • Have an awesome time at your baby shower. Make sure to get lots of pictures.
  • Buy the essentials. Anything that you didn’t get at your baby shower should be purchased by the end of the month.

Some women feel great all the way through their third trimester. But for some, this is when they start to get really uncomfortable. As you take on these to-dos, be sure your planning plenty of time for rest.

Month 8

The countdown is on now! You should be settling down for some rest at this point, but there are still a few tasks on your to-do list for this month.

  • Pack your hospital bag. Hopefully, your little one won’t make their entrance early, but in case they do, your bag should be packed.
  • Have a maternity photoshoot. You might not feel like having your picture taken right now, but once the baby is here you’ll want the memories of what that bump looked like. Finding a maternity photographer is important since you want someone who specializes in this kind of photoshoot.
  • Pick a pediatrician. Do your research, meet with a few, and pick your favorite by the end of the month. They’ll drop in to check out your baby after birth.
  • Get tested for Group B Strep. If you test positive, you’ll need antibiotics during labor to protect your baby. But don’t worry. Baby’s not in danger if you have it. The antibiotics take care of that.

At this point, you might be having trouble sleeping. That can make keeping up with these to-dos difficult. But make sure you’re keeping on top of them since your baby is almost here.

Month 9

Once you hit week 37 of your pregnancy baby can safely come at any time. Because of this, you should take care of any last-minute to-dos in the first couple of weeks of month 9.

  • Make and freeze some meals. Cooking is the last thing you want to do when the baby gets here. So, set yourself up for success by making some easy to reheat meals and sticking them in the freezer.
  • Install your car seat. Your partner does not want to be stuck trying to figure this out in the hospital parking lot, so take care of it now.
  • Send thank-you notes for shower gifts. There won’t be any time for this with a newborn.
  • Try to relax. This will be difficult considering you’re uncomfortable and anxious about the baby’s impending arrival. But do your best to practice some relaxation and breathing techniques. These will be indispensable during labor. 

The last weeks of pregnancy are a time of both excitement and anxiety for most women. Take as much time as you need for yourself, and make sure you’re getting help from loved ones to handle these last few tasks. 

Conquering Your Pregnancy To-Do List

This looks like a lot. And that’s because it is! There’s a lot to do to prepare for your baby’s arrival. But lucky for you, you’ve got time. 

Follow this month by month pregnancy to-do list and you’ll be as prepared as you can be for your new little one.
For more information about preparing to meet your baby, check out the Parenting section of our website.
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6 Things to Talk about When Teaching Your Child How to Be Less Stressed about School

School has been proven to be one of the most stressful and complicated periods in a person’s life. Young people experience a multitude of stress due to school demands and relationships with their peers.

High levels of stress can cause consequences lasting up to adulthood, and it is vital to have conversations with your children to help them avoid the constant feeling of pressure.

Early education helps children acquaint with social norms, and transition between the levels ensures smooth integration into society. And although it has multiple obvious benefits, the mere thought of school can be terrifying to some kids.

Tell-Your-Child-That-Imperfection-Is-Okay
source:

Tell Your Child That Imperfection Is Okay

Academic demands keep on increasing, and the homework might seem never-ending. Talking to your child about your own time in school can help them realize they are not alone in this.

Tell them that practice makes perfect and that the point of homework is not to bring stress out but to make sure the given material is understood.

You can help them finish a term paper or find a Term Paper Writing Service to check their formatting. Read a helpful article and complete the assignment together. By acknowledging their struggle, you will give your child support the lack of which might have been contributing to their overall stress level.

Ask About Their Day and the Challenges They Face

You cannot solve the issue if you do not know about it. That’s why it is important to talk to your kids on a daily basis. Ask them how their day went, what new happened in school, and make sure they are not being bullied.

In return, you can tell them how was your day at work and share some personal stories. This will help you bond with a kid better. Who knows, maybe next time he or she will come up to you first.

Once you find out what are the main challenges your kid faces in school, you will be able to solve them. Chances are, there is one big issue, and the rest are just adding up to it.

If you find and resolve the major reason for stress, the rest will not cause as much trouble.

Help Children Figure out a Solution Independently

As children get older, they feel the need to become more independent, and that might bring about the feeling of isolation.

The best you can do is help them resolve their issues on their own. Give advice instead of proposing a strict path to follow. Guide but don’t point.

There is no ultimate solution to every problem, and what seems correct to you might not be the only way or a proper choice for your kid.

Keep in Touch with School Staff and Other Parents

Even if your kid seems fine, they might be going through a hard time. As a parent, you never want to see a child in a stressful situation, and if this happens, your main goal is to solve the issue.

Sometimes children feel more comfortable sharing with their peers rather than with parents. Try talking to school employees or parents of your child’s classmates. If their kids are more open with them, you might find answers to some of your questions, and it will be easier to start a conversation with your own child.

Learn to Handle and Talk About Your Own Stress

Bad days happen. Actually, they are unavoidable. If you had one of those, tell your child what happened when you come home. Be open with a kid, and you will build trust that is so vital in coping with stress.

Next time maybe your child will help you handle a stressful day and not vice versa. Come up with an evening ritual for both of you: have a chat over a warm cup of tea or watch a movie together.

If you are open enough and show your child that talking about the problem is a way to cope with it, the results will amaze both of you.

Talk About Others but Never Compare

When you see your child struggling with homework and losing motivation, remind them of your relative or an acquaintance who has graduated recently and is doing great now.

It is crucial to have someone to relate to, but make sure never to compare your child to anyone. This might do the opposite – make them feel small and unimportant.

Learn-to-Handle-and-Talk-About-Your-Own-Stress.

Final Words

In conclusion, multiple studies have shown that school-induced stress can cause detrimental effects on children’s wellbeing. This article has attempted to help parents understand the reasons behind school-related stress and show them how to keep track of their kids’ mental health.
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New Driver On The Road: Its Your Teen

 New-Driver-On-The-Road-Its-Your-TeenEvery parent will experience it and we were teens once but when it comes to our own kids we have those doubts that they will be able to navigate busy streets and highways. It all becomes about defensive driving. And will it be your car they are driving or will they have their own to start out with?

First what the experts say:

From Edgar Synder  Statics shows there are young drivers between 15- and 20-years-old accounted for 6.4% (13.2 million) of total drivers on the road. An average of nine teens ages 16-19 was killed every day from motor vehicle injuries. 2,739 drivers ages 15-20 were killed and an additional 228,000 were injured in crashes.

So what can you teach them they might not be aware of.

Here are tips I shared with my kids while they were learning to drive.

Buckle Up

First, stay alert, keep your eyes moving

Keep your hands on the wheel.

Watch for slow-moving traffic

Read the road signs

Maintain the proper speed and keep a safe distance

At a stop (you should be able to see the rear tires of a car in front of you)

Becoming a good driver takes time behind the wheel and with experience and some luck, your teen will gain the skills. I had 1 rule for my teens when they first started driving, and that was they were not allowed to have friends with them when they drove for at least 3 months, and when I felt they were driving responsibly I would allow 1 friend.

There are other things that your teen should be warned about when driving:

Being courteous to others, like when they signal to move over, let them in.

Be sure other drivers see you, use your turn signals, don’t assume drivers know what you are doing

Navigating through construction areas: As a driver watch for construction barricades which are bright orange along the road.

If they ever feel upset, frustrated or anger to pull over and take a break.

Be a good example while driving with your teen. As an example, when getting ready to get on the freeway, how to merge into traffic, bringing the car up to speed with traffic or getting off the freeway, to give yourself time for the existing coming up to be in the right lane.

Something I always did was let my kids drive me on errands, so they had time to spend behind the wheel. Every time they spend driving with you being supervised is an opportunity to gain experience. And with some time, your teen will turn into a safe driver, like you!
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Every Parent’s Option For Their Child’s School And Education

Every-Parent’s-Option-For-Their-Child’s-School-And-EducationAs a parent, one of the most crucial responsibilities we have is providing our children with a quality education. What’s good is that these days, we have numerous educational options, including public schools, charter, home school, virtual education, private and international schools like International Schools in Singapore. Unsure which option best suits your child? Not to worry, keep reading to find out.

Public Schools 
For most countries like Singapore, public education is not compulsory for students and there are several educational alternatives as well. The advantage of enrolling in a public school includes having all-encompassing governance that focuses on accountability and equal education opportunities for children regardless of race, religion or ability.

Public schools are open and free of charge to all students nationwide since it is funded by state and federal governments.

Charter Schools 
Like
Public schools, charter schools are publicly funded, but can operate independently and are privately managed. Charter schools are usually a misunderstood option. There just isn’t enough press out there that tells people the good things about charter schools. These schools are unique because they offer a dual focus on inquiry-based learning and academics.

The advantages include having the structure and support of public schools while having the freedom to explore subjects such as science, math, and the arts. Charter schools also provide a more personalized experience.

Home school 
Parents have different reasons for their choice to home school their children, with many of them citing a concern about the school’s environment.

Parents who prefer this approach wants to teach their kids to think, often thinks of schools as a conveyor belt of education where every child is forced to do the same thing. Another advantage is that kids are learning every day, all day. This flexibility goes beyond the home – it can be in the car, on vacation, everywhere.

Virtual education 
In recent years and with the development of new and accredited online institutions worldwide, benefits have been made in the virtual learning field. Online schools can serve many areas, sometimes even spanning regions. Just be careful to choose fully accredited, common core-compliant and reliable academies. Virtual education allows students to pursue their education in a way that is appropriate for their needs.

Flexibility is indeed the big draw since students can just log in and work at a time and place convenient to them, but a student must be disciplined, focused, goal-oriented and driven for them to be successful in this free-ranging educational model.

Private Schools
Private schools, as you know are non-funded and independent institutions that let students and their families take part in an educational experience according to their life or religious values. Private schools are almost always tuition-based, usually with scholarships and assistance for some students as necessary.

One of the private school’s advantages is that it lets parents choose a school that will best match their own educational philosophies as well as their child’s needs.

International Schools
As private schools, international schools are independent institutions that follow a generally unique curriculum. This includes the world-renowned International Baccalaureate Programme, which is perfect for expat kids to high-schoolers and their parents. With institutions like the International Schools in Singapore, parents are ensured that their kids get balanced, focused, reliable, and top-notch education with a focus on variety, real-world exercises, and learning that readies the children for enrollment to renowned institutions like the Ivy League Universities.

 There you have it. As a parent, your decision will be based on your child’s capabilities and needs, as well as your family’s current location and situation. Whatever you choose, your child’s welfare must be considered with top priority.
[…]
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