What Science Says: Is the Pregnancy Glow Real? 1 comment


What Science Says Is The Pregnancy Glow Real

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At some point in your pregnancy, you probably got comments about your skin’s glow or radiant appearance. Prior to having a baby, you’ve been so religious with skincare routines, but you still get a pimple here and there. Who knew growing a bump will be the fix, right? But is the pregnancy glow truly real? Or are people just too kind towards the pregnant lady? And you’ve gotten carried away by people’s praises that you start to believe it, too?

The Real Deal about Pregnancy Glow

The short answer is that pregnancy glow is real. But contrary to what your aunt says, it has nothing to do with your baby’s gender. It’s also not your own happiness creating this. There are many factors as to why you’re radiant. For one, it’s the changes in the hormone levels. When you get pregnant, estrogen, progesterone, and human chorionic gonadotropin increase. Inside your body, these body chemicals help prepare the uterus and nurture the baby into further development. On the outside, they give off that flushed-look on the skin.

Another reason for the glow is the fact that your body pumps more blood to support the growing baby. As noted by a doctor of obstetrics in Provo, this increased blood volume causes blood vessels to dilate, again leaving a nice, warm blush in your appearance. Both the hormone changes and stronger blood flow cause the body to produce more oils, making for the blooming look. There’s no specific time as to when women get the glow. It’s simply when the peak of the pregnancy changes happen. For most people though, it’s during the second trimester.

Absence of the Glow Absence of the Glow

Not all pregnant women will get the glow though. If you don’t experience it, that shouldn’t be a cause of concern. It just means your skin responds differently to what’s happening inside your body. As mentioned earlier also, given that sebum production increases, there’s also the possibility of developing acne. If you had pimples in the past or experience breakouts at the start of your menstrual cycle, you’re most likely to develop this while pregnant. Resist the urge of self-medications. Some acne treatments may be harmful to the baby, so make sure to consult your doctor first before applying or taking any treatments.

Aside from acne, other pregnant women may also notice brown spots on the skin. The stark contrast of pregnancy glow, this is called the ‘pregnancy mask.’ This happens due to hyperpigmentation as the body releases more melanin, again, as a result of hormone changes. These should go away after giving birth. But do note that too much sun exposure can exacerbate them. So apply sunscreen every day. Choose products whose active ingredient is zinc oxide and/or titanium oxide, because they’re hypoallergenic. Those that offer SPF 30 and up will do. Re-apply it every three hours.

Is pregnancy glow real? Yes, it is. It’s one of the natural changes you can expect while expecting. But at the same time, you can also expect the pregnancy mask, the not-so-pretty aspect of having a baby. All the same, for a healthy nine-month journey, welcome and embrace the changes, whatever they are. Good and bad.
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10 Household Products To Save Busy Moms Time
5 Easy Home DIY Projects for Expectant Mothers

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About Karren Haller

I am a +70 Blogger that loves connecting with other women through blogging. A new recipe always intrigues, finding a new craft, creating bracelets occasionally and gardening is a favorite and writing brand reviews is a favorite for my readers. But most of all the connection to other bloggers. Creativity, simple life and getting things done

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